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Bringing Racialized Narratives into the Conversation about Workplace Toxicity

Background

In the past, organizations, labor unions, and human resources have been developed to exclude racialized narratives of workplace toxicity. These institutions have been created to protect the majority's interests and maintain the status quo. However, as organizations struggle to create more inclusive workplaces, they often fail to take accountability for the normal racialized bullying that incapacitates diversity, equity, and inclusion change.

Historically, organizations have been designed to promote the interests of the dominant group. This has resulted in a workplace culture often hostile to minority groups. Labor unions have also been complicit in this exclusionary culture, as they have often focused on protecting the interests of their members rather than advocating for the rights of all workers.

Human resources have also been developed to serve the organization's interests rather than the individual employee. This has led to a culture where complaints of workplace toxicity are often dismissed or ignored, especially if they come from minority employees.

Organizations have begun to recognize the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion, so they have implemented various initiatives to address these issues. However, many of these initiatives have been superficial, focusing on surface-level changes rather than addressing systemic issues perpetuating workplace toxicity.


The Impact

One of the most significant issues organizations fail to address is racialized bullying. This type of bullying is often normalized in the workplace, with minority employees subjected to microaggressions, discrimination, and exclusionary behavior. This creates a toxic work environment that can incredibly damage employees' mental health and well-being.

To create a more inclusive workplace, organizations must take accountability for the racialized bullying within their walls. This means acknowledging the problem, listening to the experiences of minority employees, and implementing systemic changes to address the root causes of workplace toxicity.


Wrapping it Up

In conclusion, organizations, labor unions, and human resources have historically excluded racialized narratives of workplace toxicity. As organizations strive to create more inclusive workplaces, they must take accountability for the normal racialized bullying that truly incapacitates diversity, equity, and inclusion change. By addressing these issues head-on, organizations can create a more equitable and inclusive workplace for all employees.

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